Sign in

Forge
A publication from Medium on personal development.

Positivity

In Forge. More on Medium.

Sometimes, fighting the feeling can be as straightforward as redefining it

A pile of burnt-out matches on a piece of concrete.
A pile of burnt-out matches on a piece of concrete.
“burnt matches” by areta ekarafi/Flickr

Inevitably, every few months, I’ll follow the demands of a creative career and a tough schedule straight into an energy crash. I find myself totally zapped, at a complete loss for story ideas or inspiration. “I need a break,” I’ll tell my friends. “I’m burnt out.”


Turn doomscrolling into joyscrolling

Blue filtered image of a woman with curly hair looking at her phone with a smile.
Blue filtered image of a woman with curly hair looking at her phone with a smile.
Photo illustration; Image source: Delmaine Donson/Getty Images

At this point, we’re all pros at doomscrolling. The end of the presidential election brought a brief respite, but we could really use a longer break. Or a sabbatical, if we’re being honest.


A therapist’s advice for how to manage the guilt

Photo: 10'000 Hours/Getty Images

In a handful of small ways, for many of us, life during quarantine is… kind of nice. We’re rekindling old friendships, adopting new pets, eating cake for breakfast. We don’t have commutes anymore. There are no unwanted plans to halfheartedly show up for.


I know my glass-half-full attitude can be annoying, but panic isn’t the only way to respond

A view of empty shelves as toilet roll is almost sold out in a supermarket.
A view of empty shelves as toilet roll is almost sold out in a supermarket.
Photo: Gareth Fuller/PA Images/Getty Images

Look, if anyone knows how annoying I am, it’s definitely me: the woman who has never once purchased Purell. Who has never deigned to open the bathroom door with her soggy paper towel. Whose home medical supply remains limited to treatments for hangovers, heavy flows, and the early signs of aging.


‘Hang in there!’ can do more harm than good

Photo: Picture Alliance/Getty Images

When my dad was diagnosed with colon cancer at age 52, I was flooded with emails, calls, and in-person pep talks from friends and acquaintances. Anyone who’d ever met me, it seemed, was eager to offer up a platitude. “Think positive,” they told me. “It will be okay. He’ll get through this.”

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store