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Forge
A publication from Medium on personal development.

Death

In Forge. More on Medium.

Lessons from my father on gratitude, service, and the power of showing up

Photo courtesy of the author

Every other week, Paul Ollinger investigates how redefining success can help us lead better lives.


Guide To Google Drive

How to process the memories that live on our devices

Light blue filtered photo of woman upset sitting on the couch with Google Drive icons with cloud and sparkles in foreground.
Light blue filtered photo of woman upset sitting on the couch with Google Drive icons with cloud and sparkles in foreground.
Photo illustration; Image source: fizkes/Getty Images

This piece is part of How Google Drive Can Make Every Corner of Your Life Easier


Illustrations: Katya Dorokhina

How to Write Anything

Here’s how to express sympathy and grief on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, or anywhere

This story is part of Forge’s How to Write Anything series, where we give you tips, tricks, and principles for writing all the things we write in our daily lives online, from tweets to articles to dating profiles.


Gavin lived 76 days. What he taught me will last forever.

Gavin David Bruce Norton. Photo courtesy of the author

Today, January 7, makes 10 years since Baby Gavin passed. I’m sharing a story with a life-changing lesson.


A four-step guide to cleaning out your parents’ house after they die

Photo: 10'000 Hours/Getty Images

The first item on any list, my mom always said, should be to make a list. That way, you can cross something off immediately.


Envisioning your funeral sounds morbid, but research suggests that contemplating your mortality has real psychological benefits

Credit: ProjectB/Getty

I driving my kids to school, trying my best to block out the intermittent screams from the backseat as they squabble over snacks, when a scene from my own funeral flashes into my mind.


It has nothing to do with his money, business strategies, or world-saving ideas

Credit: NICHOLAS KAMM/Getty

Bill Gates is fascinating for many reasons: his wealth, his habits, his ideas.


Joint Accounts

We’ve been together for 20 years, but he wants to leave everything to his adult children

An illustration of a couple facing each other against a colorful collage of wills, wedding rings, a car, a home and children.
An illustration of a couple facing each other against a colorful collage of wills, wedding rings, a car, a home and children.
Illustration: Laurie Rollitt

Dear Joint Accounts,

My partner and I have been together for 20 years. We both have adult children from previous marriages. The problem is, he won’t add me to his will. His children are his beneficiaries, but they are doing fine financially.

We’ve talked about marriage before, but if he’s not committed enough to include me in his will, I don’t really think we should be tying the knot. I would like some kind of resolution to this, though. Am I wrong to expect him to add me to his will?

Sincerely,

Left out

For many people, end-of-life planning can…


It’s a reminder that life begins and ends with complexity, not perfection

Nora at home with her son, Ralph. Credit: Star Tribune/Getty Images

Five years ago, at age 31, I became the widowed mom of a toddler when my husband, Aaron, died of a brain tumor — immediately following my father’s death, and before that, a miscarriage.

Forge

A publication from Medium on personal development.

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