It’s Good to Feel Small

Extreme weather may help remind humans of their place in the bigger scheme of things

Douglas Rushkoff
Forge

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Photo: Audun Bakke Andersen/Getty Images

Like many north easterners, I’m still digging myself out from the destruction of Hurricane Ida — or, as my insurance company reminds me—“tropical depression” Ida, which is not eligible for a claim on my special “hurricane extension.” Although I lost some precious archives (letters from Timothy Leary, the first dozen Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle comics, newspapers saved from the JFK assassination, moon landing, and Nixon resignation) the real damage was light. My finished basement is now, well, finished in another way.

But the waves of muddy water that took out my home office did a whole lot worse to many of my friends and neighbors, who could only watch as cars floated into their homes, their kids had to be rescued from upstairs floors by fire fighters, and their houses became unlivable. Nothing like this had happened here in anyone’s living memory.

As the water began to rise

As I looked over the devastated high school track and football field with a former local cop who has lived here for 65 years, he remarked to me “well, at least we don’t have to worry about this…

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Douglas Rushkoff
Forge

Author of Survival of the Richest, Team Human, Program or Be Programmed, and host of the Team Human podcast http://teamhuman.fm